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Climate In Malaysia And Borneo

The Malaysian climate is typically hot and humid all year around with temperatures ranging from just above 20c to over 30’c depending on where in the country you are and the month you are travelling. Temperatures at night seldom drop below 20’c, so Malaysia’s climate can take some getting used to during the first few days of your Malaysia and Borneo trip. Due to these consistent high temperatures, this makes Malaysia a great place to travel to all year around if you are looking for a hot and sunny beach destination for your summer holiday or even during the winter months if you wish to escape the cold winter in the UK.

East Coast of Malaysia.

The weather in Malaysia is strongly affected by the monsoon rains that begin from mid-October to end of February along the East Coast of the Malaysian Peninsula. During these months, the east-coast experiences high winds and rough seas, as a result the resorts on islands such as Pulau Perhentians, Pulau Lang Tengah and Pulau Tioman, close down for the season as the boats that normally help transfer their guests to the islands stay in the port. It’s best to avoid this time of year if you’re planning to travel to this part of Malaysia.

Malaysian Peninsula.

The rest of the Malaysian Peninsula does not really have a real rainy season as such, though you may find that rainfall is more frequent between the months of February – April. The rainfall that occurs on the rest of the Peninsula tends to fall in short downpours which normally do not last for more than a couple of hours at a time. This means that you can plan your Malaysia trip for any time.

The amount of rainfall and temperatures you can experience during your Malaysia trip is all dependent on where you are in the country, for example if you are in the bustling capital of Kuala Lumpur the temperature will be tend to be higher than the cooler hills and plantations of the Cameron Highlands. Also you will find that the temperatures experienced on the Malaysia’s Islands and along the coast of Malaysia, will be slightly cooler than the capital due to the refreshing coastal / sea breezes.

Malaysia along with other countries in South-East Asia, has very high levels of humidity around the 90% mark, so bear this in mind when you’re booking your Malaysia trip. Again along with variations of rainfall and temperatures, humidity is dependent on where you are in the country with less humidity being in the mountainous areas of Malaysia.

Malaysian Borneo

Malaysian Borneo has a very similar climate to the Malaysian Peninsula and can be visited all year around. The Malaysian climate is typically hot and humid all year around with temperatures ranging from just above 20’c to over 30’c depending on where in the country you are and the month you are travelling. Temperatures at night rarely drop below 20’c, so upon arrival in Malaysia its climate can take some getting used to. Due to these consistent high temperatures, this makes Malaysian Borneo a great place to travel to whatever the time of year, whether you are looking for adventure or relaxation.

Sarawak, Borneo

Between the months of mid-October to the end of February is when the state of Sarawak experiences that most of the rainfall, with most of the rain falling during the months of December and January around the capital Kuching. If you’re planning to spend a large part of your Malaysia and Borneo trip on Sulawesi, it’s best to avoid these months.

Sabah, Borneo

Between the months of May and November is when the state of Sabah experiences most of its rainfall. In general the climate in Sabah can be more varied compared to the state of Sarawak which is due to the states variety of different landscapes, ranging from dense jungles to cooler mountain peaks. This makes it difficult to predict the weather for travelling in Sabah, but you’ll have a great time whenever you choose to travel.

Want to know more about travelling in Mlalaysia and Borneo. We can help you build your own unique Malaysia Travel Plan.

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